The burn of the beam/For thirty-three days/Day after day/Of high-energy rays

Writing and doctoring/nursing are twin professions in my mind. It makes perfect sense that the two things I love most in this world are literature and medicine.

What a Sisyphean effort–both pursuits–spending all hours of the day and night fighting against entropy, suffering, and for your efforts being sometimes baffled at moments of transcendence. Making sense of this big mess of human stuff.

Poets, doctors, nurses, practice in the space between what we know as fact and the mystery of pretty much everything else. It’s a magical space, and for many people I think it must be where god lives. It’s where I keep cellular respiration and Leaves of Grass.

Ebola, Epidemiology

So far this semester of nursing school we’ve spent less than an hour talking about Ebola in America. There is legitimate concern for good guidance on PPE. CDC guidelines have been in evolution, which makes health care workers nervous.

PPE(NY Times)

BUT, epidemiology views the population as the patient. And right here right now we are looking pretty healthy. Ebola is an epidemiologist’s dream since you are not contagious until you are showing symptoms (no latency), and the course is long (outbreaks spread from patient to patient relatively slowly). It is fairly easy to find people who may have been exposed and quarantine them before they have a chance to pass along the virus. Contrast these characteristics with those of the flu, and you can see why the CDC isn’t sweating too much.

Also, what does this even mean? No.
cnn ebola

Everything is about the menstrual cycle.

ovary

Week 44: Reproductive System: Puberty « A Primer for Women’s Health.

The National Institute for Women’s Health topic of the week is puberty. On a similar note, informal interviews of my peers indicate that women in their 30s also go through hormonal changes, often experiencing breast discomfort, acne, and a dysphoria that makes them wonder what the hell happened in their 20s.